JAPAN

The source of the sun or the bright sun, from: ni 日 any Sun, Hun أي ie upstream or origin.) Country in East Asia, located between The Pacific Ocean, the Sea of ​​Japan and the eastern peninsula of the Korean peninsula. The Chinese launched the name of the bright land – the source of the sun, for it is located in the far east of the then inhabited world. Japan consists of many islands (about 3,000 islands), four of which are the most important and largest ever, respectively (from south to north): Kyushu (九州), Shikoku (四)), Honshu (州州), Hokkaido ). After the adoption of the Constitution in 1947, Japan’s system of government was transformed into a constitutional monarchy with an elected emperor and parliament.

Japan consists of 47 counties. These provinces can be divided according to geographical and historical background to eight regions: Hokkaido, Tohoku, Kanto, Chubu, Kinki, Chugoku, Shikoku and Kyushu-Okinawa. Each region is unique in its own dialect, customs and traditional heritage. For example, the Kanto region, which includes Tokyo from the Kansai region, which has Osaka, varies greatly from food tasting to traditional performing arts, and people enjoy the experience of difference and comparison. Japan has a population of 128 million. [20]
Mountainous regions occupy more than 70% of the territory of Japan, and major cities are concentrated in the remaining plains, which account for less than 30% of the area. Cities with a population of more than 1 million are: Sapporo, Hokkaido, Sendai, Tohoku, Kawasaki, Saitama, Tokyo and Yokohama in Kanto, Nagoya in Chubu, Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe in Kinki, Hiroshima in Chugoku Fukuoka city in Kyushu area. Tokyo is the capital, without a doubt, the most important city in Japan. Other cities play a political, economic and cultural role in their regions

Japan has a total area of ​​378,000 square kilometers, equivalent to one-sixth of Saudi Arabia’s territory and one-third of Egypt’s area, more than 1.5 times the size of Britain. Mountains occupy almost three quarters of the area, covering the rest of the plains and valleys. Japan consists of a long series of islands, with a maximum distance of 3,000 kilometers in the north and south. and the main islands are Hokaido, Honsho, Shikoko, Kiosho. Japan is surrounded by rich seas, warm and cold, making it rich in fish wealth. [21]
Most of Japan is located in the temperate northern region and is dominated by wet seasonal weather. Southeasterly winds from the Pacific Ocean during the summer, and northwesterly winds from the Eurasian continent in winter. Japan has four distinct seasons: Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. Perhaps the most beautiful of the two landscapes in Japan are the landscape that opens the sakura – cherry blossoms – in the spring, bright colors of red, orange and yellow for autumn leaves. The Japanese enjoy the features that show the change of seasons and follow their latest developments in customized aerial reports showing the places where they are most prevalent. The northern and southernmost regions have a wide variation in climate. For example, in March you can choose between enjoying a sunbath in the south or skiing in the north. [21]
Japan often suffers from serious natural disasters such as hurricanes, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Although these disasters can lead to many lives, such as the large Hanshin Awaji earthquake in January 1995 and the Niigata earthquake in October 2004, the Japanese have been working hard for several years to reduce their destructive effects. Japan is using the latest technologies to design quake-resistant buildings and to follow the storm tracks with precision

Japan often suffers from serious natural disasters such as hurricanes, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Although these disasters can lead to many lives, such as the large Hanshin Awaji earthquake in January 1995 and the Niigata earthquake in October 2004, the Japanese have been working hard for several years to reduce their destructive effects. Japan uses state-of-the-art technologies to design quake-resistant buildings and track storm trajectories with precision. [21]
Japan is economically one of the most advanced countries in the world. Japanese brands such as Toyota, Sony, Fuji and Panasonic have a global reputation. Manufacturing is one of the pillars of Japanese economic power, but Japan has few natural resources. Therefore, one of the methods followed by Japanese companies is to import raw materials and convert them to products sold locally or exported. Robotics is one of the most promising areas for future economic growth, with Japanese technology outperforming the rest of the world. Asimo, a humanoid robot developed by Honda, can walk two feet and speak human language. In the near future, robotics will be involved in a number of areas, and it could be that robots coexist side by side with humans, as seen in science fiction films. [22]
Rice is the main agricultural product in Japan and most of the rice consumed in Japan is from domestic production. Because Japan has little agricultural land compared to its population, it is unable to cultivate enough wheat, soybeans or other major crops to feed all its people. In fact, Japan ranks low among industrialized nations in terms of food self-sufficiency. Which means that they have to import large quantities of food from abroad. Japan, however, has enormous maritime wealth. Fish are an important part of the Japanese diet, and the Japanese fishing industry is a very active industry. [22]
Japan’s transportation system is highly developed. Road and rail networks cover almost every part of the country, and there are also very wide sea and air transport services. Rapid trains, called Shinkansen or bullet trains, move at very high speeds of 250 to 300 kilometers per hour. The Shinkansen train network is the appropriate vehicle for travel in Japan. The Shinkansen is one of the safest and most advanced rail systems in the world. [22]
In addition to the Shinkansen, Japan has a passenger rail network. There are many networks of underground Japanese cities. Tokyo’s subway network, which includes more than a dozen lines covering hundreds of kilometers of railways, is one of the best in the world and continues to evolve. Millions of Japanese use railways every day to go to work, to school, or to return from either. All Japanese trains are famous for cleanliness and punctuality

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